@emilmagn

https://www.instagram.com/emilmagn/

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53mm Featured by Iain Palmer

@Emilmagn Is Emil Magnusson, a photographer from Stockholm, Sweden.

A street photographers remit is often seen as documenting the candid sights, scenes, events and opportune moments they encounter on the streets. As simple a definition of street photography as that might be, I've always thought of this particular genre of photography as being one of the hardest to do right. Anyone can take a camera into the streets and capture photographs of its people or buildings or spaces or trends but to honestly make those images as aesthetically pleasing or narrative as possible, one must have a certain way of seeing the ordinary and make it appear interesting. Capturing what we see everyday in a way that encourages inquisition of some sort, or persuades us to see diurnal things as beautiful can have its challenges. Not every photographer has this insight or indeed foresight into their surroundings. One can only look at the masters of the genre to get a real indication as to what it takes to succeed in this style. 

Emil's eye for street photography first caught my attention with a very simple composition of warm, subtle colours mixed with mellow shadows and dulcet tones. The balance of lines, angles and soft textures gave an impression that here was a photographer who understood how to capture a simple scene, in this case the facade of a building, and make it pleasant to look at, admire or be reminded of warmer evenings enjoying the twilight sun. I could place myself there in an instant and reminisce. I could relate to what may have been the intention of the photograph. 

The photographs that came thereafter were further superb examples of this natural vision to make what was everyday seem engrossing, riveting and fascinating to observe.

To do all these things, the employment of light, space, subjects, objects, line, form, balance, composition as well as contrast, tone and colour has to be unerring and from what I have seen from Emil's Instagram feed, these visual aspects are all there.

I often think of the peerless work of William Eggleston and am reminded of his effortless skill to make the mundane beautiful, especially through his innovative use of colour when I enjoy Emil's work.

It's a great modern take on Eggleston's practice of street photography and an extension too as some of Emil's photographs brink on the cinematic in execution and appearance. 

His weapons of choice help Emil to capture these outstanding pieces. The Fuji X-Pro2 and XF35mm f/2 lens are fast becoming a choice combination for many photographers but with so many using this photographic union, there comes the need to be individual and characteristic in their application in order to stand out in the crowd.

This is where I see Emil, a stand alone practitioner and signature enthusiast, endeavouring to make his work carry that distinct recognition. 

_53mm_ is proud to showcase Emil's work but before I do, here is a personal reflection from Emil about his work and his application of the XF35mm lenses.

My name is Emil Magnusson, a freelance photographer from Stockholm, Sweden.
A side from my work with client where I photograph business portrait, products and artists I create conceptual photography and street/urban photos. I love the process of photography and lightning, For that reason many of my old concept have been created with analog medium format cameras. When fuji announced the x-pro 1 I saw that someone finally made a camera that embraced the things I love with analog. 
This spring I got the x-pro 2 and the 35mm f2.
A great camera and a superb lens for just about anything! This woke me up, from just doing client work for a long time, I started creating for myself again.
The 35mm f2 is always with me and often mounted on the camera.
With it, I search for interesting light, people, backgrounds, and relationships between them. 
The 35 focus quickly and accurate but for street I use it with zone focus set to around 3m at f5.6-11. I take photos as of instinct and zone focusing makes me focus on the people, movement and framing. 
For my selection I tend to choose and show images that have an almost staged like feel. They have muted colors and often contain few people framed with stable lines that dosen’t emphasis movement. 
I keep my photos in collections, different projects that grows by coincidence and in the end it will result in some exhibitions, but for now I just create and enjoying it.

 

Iain Palmer

Abundant Magazine